Your Typhoon Survival Kit

Being prepared is always one step towards survival. Here are some things that we think is important to have during times like these. Prepare them beforehand and keep them in a safe place at all times. Better yet, keep them with you, or in an area that is easy to reach and won’t get in the way of raging floods, etc.

YOUR TYPHOON SURVIVAL KIT

  1. Clean drinking water. Good enough for a week. Consider having at least 1 gallon per person per day.
  2. Other drinks. Consider: juices in packs, carbonated drinks, coffee.
  3. Food. Also good enough for a week. Consider:
    • Snacks that are easy to store and carry (biscuits, cookies)
    • Non-perishable canned food (corned beef, tuna, pork and beans, vienna sausage, etc.)
    • Candies to maintain sugar in body and keep acidity at bay
    • Bread that will last for a few days, for carbo load
    • Instant noodles, if you have the means to cook
    • IMPORTANT: food for babies and the elderly if you have them staying with you
  4. Food utensils.
    • Spoons, forks, knives, paper plates, drinking cups
    • Non-electric can opener
    • Cooking stove and fuel, if possible
    • Plastic bags
  5. Medicines. Consider having medicines for the following:
    • Fever and nausea
    • Coughs and colds
    • Hypertension
    • Diabetes
    • Diarrhea
    • Anti-tetanus
    • Anti-leptospirosis
    • Other prescription drugs that you need to take
    • Also include asthma inhalers with extra nebules and other asthma medicines
  6. First Aid kit. Must contain band-aids, gauze, tweezers, alcohol, antibiotic ointment, hydrogen peroxide, bandage scissors, absorbent dressings, antiseptic wipe packets, cold compress, gloves and thermometer.
  7. Sanitation kit. Make sure that you have tissue wipes, toilet paper, sanitary napkins, diapers.
  8. Toiletries. These include toothpaste, toothbrushes, soap.
  9. Blankets, towels, comforters, pillows. You can put them in large garbage bags to keep from getting wet.
  10. Extra clothes and underwear. Put them in plastic bags to avoid from getting wet. If you can, pack something that will last you for a few days.
  11. Jackets, sweaters, socks, caps. And anything else that will keep you warm and dry.
  12. Emergency lights and flashlights.
  13. Fresh batteries. Have reserves for batteries of different sizes, especially for radios and flashlights.
    • “Ideally batteries should be advanced lithium or lithium so they have a longer shelf life….but the new Energizer Advanced is good enough to last a lot of long usage compared to Energizer Max batteries….” [via Comments]
  14. Radio. Must be portable, battery operated, has functional AM station.
  15. Mobile phone. Make sure the battery is fully charged, and that you have a spare one, too, in case of emergency. Also consider walkie-talkies.
  16. Cash. Banks and ATMs might not be available so make sure that you have cash with you.
  17. Keys. Have copies of keys to the front door, back door, garage, car keys, etc.
  18. Items for pets. Consider also having a leash, muzzle, cage and food for your pets.
  19. Umbrellas and tents
  20. Water pails and dippers
  21. Floatation devices like life jackets, styrofoams, old tires, etc.
  22. Rope
    • “I advice against tying family members together on a rope…if one member is swept away then the others will be pulled as well unless one person has super human strength….the rope should be attached as a guy line to guide members or as an escape line from high structures…” [via Comments]
  23. Plastic whistles
    • “Fox 40 whistle is available here in the RP…definitely loud.” [via Comments]

IMPORTANT DOCUMENTS TO PROTECT

Many people have died trying to go back for these things, so it’s important that you are well-prepared already at this point in time. Keep these documents in a water-proof container:

  1. Birth certificates
  2. Insurance records
  3. Medical records
  4. SSS, Pag-ibig and Philhealth records
  5. Identification cards
  6. Passports
  7. Bank account numbers and records
  8. Emergency contact numbers (i.e. NDCC hotline numbers, PNP, etc.)
  9. Contact numbers of family, friends and loved ones

It is important that you have an ID with you wherever you go. Also, a list of people to contact in case something happens to you. If you can, put your emergency contacts on speed dial.

If you have more suggestions, please leave them in the comments section.

Updated as of 2 October 2009, 9:14 AM.

Many people have died trying to go back for such things, so it’s important that you are well-prepared already at this point in time.

36 thoughts on “Your Typhoon Survival Kit

  1. Pingback: Kitiwiti » Blog Archive » TYPHOON SURVIVAL KIT

  2. I was about to broadcast my list but thanks i don’t need to anymore: great list you have there.

    IF YOU FIND THE COMMENT TOO LONG OR NOT WORTHY TO BE POSTED, KINDLY DELETE OR IGNORE.

    Just a few more things (more like instructional):
    1. educate everyone in the household of the location (and make it accessible) of the fuse box, specially the main fuse. If flood water comes in your house house make sure to turn off the main switch. This is to avoid electrocution.
    2. Please make a short-list of the items above-mentioned that will fit into say a backpack. This is in case you need to evacuate immediately and have to move fast.
    3. Discuss an evacuation plan with the entire household members. For instance, where to go in case of flash floods; where to meet up in case you get separated; etc.
    4. (In addition to your item #17) If applicable, make sure that fire/emergency exits are accessible and, if locked, make sure the keys are readily available. Better still during the onslaught of a typhoon, consider to unlock the emergency exits at all times taking into consideration the general safety of having these exits unlocked;
    5. Have a set of candles and matches separately placed in a water proof container;
    6. if at all possible, print out or put in writing your contact nos. and put them in, yes, another water proof container (a thick plastic bag knotted tightly will do. If you loose your cell phone or run out of battery – there goes all your numbers too. Unless you have a really good memory.
    7. All members of the household should know where above-items are located such as – flashlights, medicine etc. In other words conduct a meeting. Imagine if you alone knows about your EVAC plan or where the items are located. Then you have to step out of the house or become unconscious (hope not) something to that effect.
    8. the ROPE on your list is very important – if you have no other choice but to cross thru raging waters – consider tying everyone along the rope by the waist.
    9. If you cannot contact your local authorites (barangay, local fire dept, etc), try calling 117. That’s the central emergency number of the Philippine National Police (PNP). they can directly call the authorities nearest your location either by phone and more importantly, they can use their own radio communication system.
    AND MORE IMPORTANTLY – PRAY!!! AND DO PRAY TOGETHER.

  3. i advice against tying family members together on a rope…if one member is swept away then the others will be pulled as well unless one person has super human strength….the rope should be attached as a guy line to guide members or as an escape line from high structures..

  4. prepare your evacuation items also known as a BOB or bug-out-bag in advance as when a disaster strikes there is no more time to prepare these things…again preparation and planning is vital, all members of the household must be well informed…this is one type of information that must be universally disseminated..

  5. ideally batteries should be advanced lithium or lithium so they have a longer shelf life….but the new energizer advanced is good enough to last a lot of long usage compared to energizer max batteries….

    • always remember the “triangle-of-life” principle when it comes to earthquakes…if you hide under a desk or bed and debris falls on it, you will be no better off than a squashed bug….stay beside a bed or a desk protecting yourself with your hands as best you can and there will be a lifesaving triangle between floor, bed 0r desk even if collapsed and whatever else falls on top of it….ergo the “triangle-of-life”…

  6. Pingback: Excuse me? (an update on relief efforts) « My First One Million Pesos

  7. From family friend Dr. Richard Benton of New Zealand who commented on my repost of the Survival Kit:

    You might like to add [to the Survival Kit] a small supply of salt and sugar, and even a few bananas, in case of diarrhea, which can prove fatal if unchecked. In the absence of available medical help, a fairly effective formula for rehydration (when dehydration is not severe — that requires more drastic intervention, e.g. IV treatment) is a mixture of 1 litre water, 8 teaspoons sugar and 1 teaspoon salt, at 50 ml per kg of weight, over four hour periods. A little at a time, not in one gulp. Bananas will help replace potassium which is lost quite rapidly too in diarrhea.

  8. Pingback: My Penance: Sharing Survival Tips « Just a thought…

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  10. Pingback: Typhoon Preparations | my little ways

  11. how about some duct tapes, i heard that i would be helpful in sealing our house especially from radiation though expensive its better to have one or two…

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